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Old 03-02-2023, 07:42 PM   #11
live4fun
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I thought I had figured out until we discussed the fuse situation. Iíve included pictures of my setup and the location of current fuses.

Photo 1+2 Shows the 10Amp fuse coming from the solar panels to the solar Disconnect Switch, And my main 100amp fuse is protecting the TM from the battery side.

Photo 3 shows my distribution blocks where Iíd connect my new 2000 watt inverter with the 1/0 conductor.

Photo 4 is my system where I will install my new inverter. Iíve wanted to make sure Iím protecting system the right way especially with the fuse types and locations. Currently, Iím stretching myself with my knowledge of this system as it has gotten more complex from battery, to solar, and now to inverter.

Let me know what you think about the fuses and anything else that would make this system work out better. I havenít purchased all the components yet but Iím getting close. Thanks again Kurt
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Old 03-08-2023, 06:03 PM   #12
Wavery
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I would suggest a couple changes in your basic layout.

#1. I would put the 2 batteries side by side and attach them in parallel with either solid copper busbars or very short (maybe 3" long) 1/0 identical length cables.

#2 I would run a 6" - 12" long (maximum) 1/0 cable from one positive battery stud to your positive distribution block.

#3 Attach your shunt directly to the negative stud of the other battery.

#4 Run the exact same length cable from the shunt to your negative distribution block. (equal cable lengths are very important).

Now you can run your positive and negative (appropriate sized) cables to your devises from the distribution blocks.

#4. Place your inverter 6"-12" (or as close as possible) to your positive and negative distribution blocks. Run as short a 1/0 cable as possible from your positive distribution block to your 150-175A ANL or Mega fuse block. Attach the other side of the fuse block directly to the positive side of your inverter if possible. If it's not possible to to attach it directly, use a heavy copper busbar or a very short 1/0 cable.

The objective of all of this is to shorten your cables as much as possible from the batteries to your distribution block and on to your inverter. The longer the cable, the more resistance. The more the resistance, the less the efficiency and the higher the heat. Heat is waisted watts.

Moving on to your solar. I've never seen a solar isolator before but I would think that it would have a built in circuit breaker of some sort. I'm not sure what that is for. The thing about the solar cables is that they need to be fused (or isolated) in both directions. The idea is to protect the cables from a short. If you put a fuse on the positive cable, you should also fuse the negative cable. I personally used a double 40A DC circuit breaker.

When making custom length cables, it's important to use the proper size pure copper lugs and a proper crimping tool. Most of the pros use hydraulic crimpers. I couldn't see the investment for a one time project so I (and many others) used the $15 "Mofeez Hammer Lug Crimper Tool" and it worked great.

EDIT..... I just notice that your distribution blocks are 1/0 gauge in and a max of 2 gauge wire out. You might be able to get away with 2G wires from the distribution blocks to the 2000W inverter but it would be best if you doubled up. That is, use 2 of the distribution block terminals and double up the wires on the inverter, Experiment by running your microwave for 5-minutes and check for heat at the inverter terminals. It should be fine.
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Old 03-14-2023, 08:51 AM   #13
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Well, here's what I have. I intentionally cut the batteries into the foam part of the flooring since the original battery has done so, used the battery covers to secure the units in tight, and I filled a large depression in the floor which I used for one battery. So the batteries were separated for that reason, and it would be a big job to undo at this time.

So I ran equal lengths of 21" 2/0 cable from each battery terminal to the appropriate distribution hub connector as shown. ( because originally I hadn't considered the microwave connection and thought I'd go with a small 300-500W inverter for small loads.

With that being said, I'm not sure where that leaves me.

1. I could go back and install the 300w inverter and leave out the microwave at this time which would be easy.
2. Redo the battery mounts close together with 1/0 wire.

I appreciate all the information. Can you tell me what if a 300W inverter is as largest device my system can tolerate without changing any conductors? Or are there any other improvements that I can do without moving the battery units to increase the amperage output until some future time?

Let me know what you think. Imam very grateful for the support and advice. Kurt
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Old 03-14-2023, 03:21 PM   #14
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Kurt, are you saying 2/0 wire or 2G wire. Huge difference. 2/0 wire is about 0.6". 2G wire is 0.25". 2G is OK for about 700W. 2/0 wire is good for about 3000+W. I think that 2/0 wire won't even fit in the distribution blocks that you have.

It really isn't the size of the inverter that matters. It's the size of the load. You can have a 2000W inverter and run 700W on 2G wire. You would just have to remember not to exceed that (or use a 60A fuse). Just hate to see you buy a 300W inverter, only to upgrade to a 2000W later.

Are you aware that you can mount those batteries on their side and stack them? You can mount them in and configuration (I wouldn't recommend upside down). You could stand them on end, side-by-side.
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Old 03-15-2023, 08:14 AM   #15
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Default You need a BIG inverter to run a microwave. 3000 continuous/6000 peak.

Quote:
Originally Posted by live4fun View Post
I have 200ah capacity from 2 Lithium batteries (100ah) connected to (3) 100W rooftop Solar panels with a 30amp controller. I have very low loads, most everything is 12v/LED, and few AC loads for my system (air con. & microwave are all I can think of). USB plugs, chargers & computer/TV stuff is accounted for in the 12V loads.

Originally, I was going to purchase a small 12v autoplug 300w power inverter to have around in case I needed it for something (charging a drill, tire compressor, etc). i could also use it in my vehicle.

But I was thinking further that I possible could use our 700W microwave for 1-4 minutes occasionally every 2-3 days just for defrost or reheating foods. Would a 1000W to 2000W inverter handle this load sufficiently, and it be compatible with my solar 12v system as explained above?
Microwave ovens create highly reactive loads. (The actual power draw is not "nicely" related to the 60 Hz sine wave of voltage being provided, it is largely out of phase.)

The problem is a bit like rotor start-up on motors, but a reactive load creates peak versus average problems continuously (not just during start-up). A 1000W RMS inverter (with roughly 2000 peak watts) would get burned out after only a few uses. I have a similar microwave oven, described as "800 watts", and installed a much larger inverter 3000w/6000w very large inverter to handle that load, as well as the Air Conditioner in unusually hot afternoon circumstances with good sunlight. I have a lot more LFP battery storage than you do, and the air conditioner has an added startup-assistance device.
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Old 03-15-2023, 08:42 AM   #16
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Default The 12-VDC wiring for a big inverter.

I have three cables each on the the Inverter 12V-DC and Grounding terminals, with the Inverter terminals themselves being the 'bus connections' for the batteries. My Inverters terminal lugs were tall enough to support this scheme.

On the 12v side, two battery cables with 200A fuses at the batteries (they are expensive fast-blow "class J" fuses, protecting each pack from a short circuit) connect to the terminal post as a "bus bar". These are big wires, AWG-00, rated with roughly the same transmission capacity as the fuses (although the short wire lengths could have them interpreted as chassis wiring. The 3rd wire, AWG-1, goes into a bus connector where smaller wires go to a few other places (8-AWG from solar controller, 6 AWG going through liquiditite conduit under the trailer body to reach the load center and the power converter, and an AWG-10 connector into a 5-way WAGO connector for other small things (an external 12v power port, the battery heater pads, and the 12v power wires to the coulomb counters and a couple of relays doing other things.

On the grounding side, its nearly the same - but without fuses. The AWG-00 wires come in from the coulomb counter shunts, the coulomb counter shunts connect to the BMS units, and the BMS units connect the battery '-' terminals.
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TM='06 2619 w/5K axle, 15" Maxxis "E" tires. Plumbing protector. 630 watts solar. 450AH LiFePO4 batteries, 3500 watt inverter. CR-1110 E-F/S fridge (compressor).
TV = 2007 4runner sport, with a 36 volt "power boost".
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