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Old 04-25-2023, 05:05 PM   #11
Bill
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Here is something I should have added to my response to Kmikesells' original post. I was reminded of this on a recent camping trip, where I learned it yet again.

As you start to back the rig, the ideal position for the TM and the tow vehicle is in a straight line. If they are in a straight line, you can tweak the direction of the TM as you back up, easily and accurately. On the other hand, if you find yourself with a lot of angle between the TM and the tow vehicle, you have lost control of the situation. If you continue backing, and you are lucky, you will eventually regain control of the TM, but you will be a long way from where you intended to go. If you keep backing and you are not lucky, the trailer will jackknife, causing enormous damage in only a few inches of travel.

If you find yourself with a lot of angle between the trailer and the tow vehicle, the best thing to do is pull forward until you get the rig straightened out. Now you can resume backing with some directional control.

How much angle is a lot? It depends on the length of the trailer. Very short trailers are almost impossible to back accurately - the trailer gets offline very quickly, and you cannot bring it back because the tow vehicle can't turn sharply enough to catch it. Very long trailers, like a 53-footer on a big rig, are much easier to back accurately, because you can steer the cab all over the place without turning the trailer much. The TM falls kind of in the middle - you can do it, but it takes care and practice. That's why we have these threads.

RBHTrail, what say you?

Bill
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Old 04-26-2023, 06:40 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Kmikesell View Post
Do you have a link to this magical marital aid?
https://www.etrailer.com/Backup-Came...tch/04928.html
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Old 04-26-2023, 09:29 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Bill
I'm not quite sure where the hitch camera is mounted. Are you putting it on a fixed ground-mount off to the side of the rig, where it can see both the tire and the marker?
Aha! This one has a magnet mount, so you could slap it onto a steel part of the truck such as a fender, and aim it so it can see both the marker and a tire - one of the truck tires, or one on the TM.

I was thinking it was bolted/screwed on a fixed position on the tow vehicle, and I couldn't make it work. A removable magnet mount makes sense to me.

Thanks

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Old 04-26-2023, 02:55 PM   #14
Kmikesell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill View Post
Here is something I should have added to my response to Kmikesells' original post. I was reminded of this on a recent camping trip, where I learned it yet again.

As you start to back the rig, the ideal position for the TM and the tow vehicle is in a straight line. If they are in a straight line, you can tweak the direction of the TM as you back up, easily and accurately. On the other hand, if you find yourself with a lot of angle between the TM and the tow vehicle, you have lost control of the situation. If you continue backing, and you are lucky, you will eventually regain control of the TM, but you will be a long way from where you intended to go. If you keep backing and you are not lucky, the trailer will jackknife, causing enormous damage in only a few inches of travel.

If you find yourself with a lot of angle between the trailer and the tow vehicle, the best thing to do is pull forward until you get the rig straightened out. Now you can resume backing with some directional control.

How much angle is a lot? It depends on the length of the trailer. Very short trailers are almost impossible to back accurately - the trailer gets offline very quickly, and you cannot bring it back because the tow vehicle can't turn sharply enough to catch it. Very long trailers, like a 53-footer on a big rig, are much easier to back accurately because you can steer the cab all over the place without turning the trailer much. The TM falls kind of in the middle - you can do it, but it takes care and practice. That's why we have these threads.

RBHTrail, what say you?

Bill
You are EXACTLY right! Should have been more specific when I suggested not getting it right the first tine....Thanks for the clarification
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Old 02-20-2024, 12:11 PM   #15
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Hello All, sorry for the years delay with responding the info. When I bought it I paid under $100 and see now it's much more.
RVS Hitch camera:
RVS-83112
WIRELESS HITCH CAMERA
The camera has a magnet to attach to the rear door panel of the car and you can move it around to see whatever you need to see, if its connecting the car ball to the trailer recpt. Or view the trailer tire by placing the camera on the ground to see exactly where you should move the tire into any place. Or get creative and move the camera onto the rear trailer licence plate and see where you want the TM rear to be. It has a 70 ft range from the camera to the monitor in the car. Great device, I'm very happy with it.
Again, sorry for the delay in responding.
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Old 02-20-2024, 05:56 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmikesell View Post
It sounds like you are an experienced "Backer-Inner". My OP was for the newbs! LOL
Coming back to this....
When we first purchased the trailer, we towed it from WA to our home in Vancouver. We got it home about 3AM and had to back it into our driveway at night. Maybe it was luck, but I got it very close to where I wanted it first try. I think you'd have to call me a lucky newbie. But definitely not an experienced "Backer-Inner! But honestly, to have a "target" for the inside wheel helps a ton! (tonne for us Canadians).
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Old 02-28-2024, 12:21 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Kmikesell View Post
It sounds like you are an experienced "Backer-Inner". My OP was for the newbs! LOL
You're right. Yelling is not the best way to co=navigate.

Work out a set of hand signals (stop, forward, right, left and go) to show distance, spread your hands apart and bring them closer together as the distance shortens. Write them down and practice. No talking. If you are the signaler, be sure that you can see the driver's face in the mirror. If you can see the driver's eye's, the driver can see your hand signals. Be sure to signal the driver, not the trailer hitch of the tree. If your hands go out of site, the driver can't see the signal. Keep your hands in front of your body.
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Old 02-29-2024, 11:14 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wavery View Post
You're right. Yelling is not the best way to co=navigate.

Work out a set of hand signals (stop, forward, right, left and go) to show distance, spread your hands apart and bring them closer together as the distance shortens. Write them down and practice. No talking. If you are the signaler, be sure that you can see the driver's face in the mirror. If you can see the driver's eye's, the driver can see your hand signals. Be sure to signal the driver, not the trailer hitch of the tree. If your hands go out of site, the driver can't see the signal. Keep your hands in front of your body.
I prefer GMRS radios for the driver and navigator. No yelling and makes sure directions are clear, and there's no worry about site lines or darkness.
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